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You are here: Home / Events / Seminars / Seminaires Septembre 2018-Aout 2019 / Vendredi 28 Juin - Submesoscale circulation modulates seasonality of marine ecosystem in the California Current System

Vendredi 28 Juin - Submesoscale circulation modulates seasonality of marine ecosystem in the California Current System

by SEMSOU last modified Jun 13, 2019 09:34 AM
When Jun 28, 2019
from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Where Salle Lyot
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Faycal Kessouri, Ph.D.

Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Authority &

University of California, Los Angeles


Title: Submesoscale circulation modulates seasonality of marine ecosystem in the California Current System


Abstract: Seasonal wind-driven upwelling supports phytoplankton blooms that turn the California Current into one of the most productive ecosystems of the ocean. Further offshore, mesoscale and submesoscale eddies counteract the upwelling by removing surface nutrients through subduction. I will demonstrate the role of the submesoscale circulation via three processes: First, submesoscale dynamics generated by increased frontogenesis during spring, controls up to 50% the vertical eddy transport of nutrients across the euphotic layer, reducing plankton productivity, and exporting biomass out of the euphotic layer. Second, in the offshore oligotrophic region, submesoscale eddies intensify the vertical velocities in winter, driving injection of nutrients from enriched thermocline to the depleted mixed layer and maintain productivity in the deep chlorophyll depth. Lastly, submesoscale eddies emphasize the generation of topographic wakes in Channel Islands leading to very high productivity as well as surfacing of unsaturated water of low pH.

Furthermore, upwelling system make this region vulnerable to ocean acidification and deoxygenation (OAD). Using these submesoscale-permitting simulations, UCLA, UW, NOAA and SCCWRP collaborate to investigate the potential exacerbation of local pollution on OAD in Southern California. The model demonstrates mechanistic linkages between physical and chemical drivers of OAD and their compression on pelagic and benthic habitats. Now, model simulations are used in ongoing discussions with local coastal managers to support local pollution and marine vulnerability assessments.

 

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